BSCRC members William Lowry, Hanna Mikkola, Michaela Patterson, David Chan and colleagues have discovered that three types of cells derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are similar to each other, but are much more developmentally immature than previously thought when compared to those same cell types taken directly from human tissue.

The researchers, from the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA, found that the progeny of the human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) were more similar to cells found within the first two months of fetal development than anything later. This could have implications both clinically and for disease modeling, said William Lowry, senior author of the study and an assistant professor of molecular, cell and developmental biology in the Life Sciences.

The two-year study was published today in the peer-reviewed journal Cell Research.